Auto Insurance Tips

What Does “Full Coverage” Actually Mean Under Florida Law?

Posted June 10, 2019 by admin_tbi

A Few Auto Insurance Tips: Many Floridians drive around with a false sense of security because they have “full coverage” according to their insurance agent. Only once they have been in an accident do they come to understand that “full coverage” provides zero protection for you if you are injured in a crash.

Of course, once you have fallen victim to an accident, it is too late to get insurance coverage. Florida law requires only two types of coverage:

  1. $10,000 in Personal Injury Protection (PIP) benefits (pays for the first $10,000 of your medical care regardless of who is at fault)
  2. $10,000 in Property Damage Liability coverage (if you cause an accident, this coverage pays up to $10,000 for the other person’s car repairs)

The only required coverage under Florida law does not provide “full coverage” as that phrase is ordinarily understood. PIP benefits are often exhausted with a single trip to the hospital and do not pay anything for pain and suffering, loss of enjoyment of life, or mental anguish which are significant damages following a serious crash.

In order to truly protect yourself, you need to carry bodily injury liability (BI) and uninsured motorist (UM) coverage. Bodily injury liability pays damages to an individual injured in an accident caused by you, and protects your personal assets if that injured person sues you. Uninsured motorist coverage pays damages to you if an uninsured or underinsured individual causes an accident that hurts you. Our firm recommends carrying $100,000 of each.

For a more detailed discussion on the importance of UM coverage, please read “Are You Really Covered? The Single Most Important Thing You Must Do to Protect Yourself in the Event of a Car Crash”.

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